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Kate Pincus-Whitney

Kate Pincus-Whitney

Kate Pincus-Whitney

“It seems to me that our three basic needs, for food and security and love, are so mixed and mingled and entwined that we cannot straightly think of one without the others. So it happens that when I write of hunger, I am really writing about love and the hunger for it, and warmth and the love of it and the hunger for it… and then the warmth and richness and fine reality of hunger satisfied… and it is all one.”
― M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating

Just as a Coca-Cola bottle in Tom Wesselmann’s Still life series is understood not simply as a coca cola bottle, but instead an icon of American identity or as in Morandi, a custard cup is not simply a cup- it is holding space as Madonna and Child, Kate Pincus-Whitney's maximalist, feminist, and unapologetically boisterous work is not only about the reality of the still life or the things painted but about the specificity of life and its cosmology. Mapping the movement of culture through histories of spices, wax candles, or fine white china bowls, her tablescapes are a place of narrative portraiture--sometimes a sort of shrine, sometimes a stage or a commons. Sometimes they are a place for formal or historical political acts of agency, and sometimes, she simply wishes to capture the essence of a person through the objects they consume or surround themselves with.